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Distinguished Education Alumni Awards

The College of Education presents Distinguished Education Alumni Awards to recognize notable professional achievements of college alumni. The honorees are selected by the college leadership and are recognized biennially.

2015 Distinguished Education Alumni Awards

Purdue's College of Education is honoring four people as distinguished alumni for 2013 during a ceremony on Friday, November 1, 2013 at the Purdue Marriott Hall.

The honorees are:  

Dorothy Lawshe

Dorothy Lawshe spent nearly 50 years in education, half of that as a tireless advocate for gifted children. Her work helped thousands of high-ability youth in Indiana and Michigan, especially those from underserved populations. As a graduate student at Purdue, Dorothy helped develop student enrichment programs. Marcia Gentry, director of Purdue’s Gifted Education Resource Institute, said, “Her work at Purdue under John Feldhusen laid a foundation for her service to the field for years to come. She was the founding director of Michigan State University’s Office of Gifted and Talented Education (GATE). Dorothy’s eff orts on behalf of gifted children are far-reaching. She has always advocated for developing talents among children from underserved populations.” An endowed fund at MSU named for Dorothy continues her mission to provide children from disadvantaged backgrounds with access to talent development programs.

Marsha LinkMarsha Link is an innovative, dynamic change agent who believes in the empowerment of lifelong learning. She is the founder and principal of Link Consulting Group, specializing in executive coaching, leadership development and organizational effectiveness. Her work has focused on the professional development and advancement of women in the healthcare industry, specifically in ophthalmology. Marsha is currently president of Ophthalmic Women Leaders (OWL), a non-profit group committed to the belief that diverse leadership results in better outcomes. She is the former chair of the board of trustees of Manchester University, where she is now an honorary trustee. Professor Emeritus Richard Nelson said, “Marsha shows exceptional capability in understanding and using best practices in counseling, as well as responding to the unique needs of her clients. She has adapted those practices in ways that suit her personality.”

Sidney MoonSidney Moon is professor I am emerita of gifted, creative and talented studies in Purdue University’s College of Education. During her 30-year career in the college, she served as associate dean for learning and engagement and as director of the Gifted Education Resource Institute (GERI). Sidney is a prolific scholar whose work continues to benefit gifted persons around the world today. In 2013, the National Association for Gifted Children recognized Sidney’s achievements and dedication with the Distinguished Service Award. Jan Hansen, president and CEO of Educate Tanzania, said, “Sidney is a one-of-a-kind thought leader in gifted education whose important work has helped ensure that gifted students are seen and that their needs are addressed in compelling and meaningful ways. Her deliberate and unceasing loyalty and commitment to the field is easy to spot and difficult to match.”

Daniel Stufflebeam

Daniel L. Stufflebeam is an icon whose work has played a major role in shaping educational evaluation. A thought leader in the assessment field, Dan retired from Western Michigan University as a distinguished university professor and McKee Professor of Education. He founded the Evaluation Center at The Ohio State University in 1965 and relocated it to WMU in 1973. His Context, Input, Process and Product (CIPP) Evaluation Model was one of the first models used for program evaluation and is still in use today. He directed the development of more than 100 standardized achievement tests, including the GED. Richard Frisbie, director of strategic assessment in the college, said, “Dan offered a framework and context for how to view a values-based world with a balance of objectivity and compassion. When the first question becomes, ‘What’s important?,’ the rest of any disciplined inquiry approach falls into place.”


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DEA 1991-2000